• October is National Bullying Prevention Month.  

    As a school district, MRH has no tolerance for bullying. Throughout the month, we will share key information and resources which students, parents and educators can turn to for information and guidance. In our first installment, MRH will focus on education: defining bullying, highlighting District policy and the consequences of bullying.

    In this series, MRH will share content from stopbullying.gov, a collaborative website brought to you by the U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Health, and the U.S. Department of Justice. 

    October 3: What is bullying?

    Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. Both kids who are bullied and who bully others may have serious, lasting problems.

    In order to be considered bullying, the behavior must be aggressive and include:

    • An Imbalance of Power: Kids who bully use their power—such as physical strength, access to embarrassing information, or popularity—to control or harm others. Power imbalances can change over time and in different situations, even if they involve the same people.

    • Repetition: Bullying behaviors happen more than once or have the potential to happen more than once.

    Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose.

    Types of Bullying

    Where and When Bullying Happens

    Frequency of Bullying

    MRH and Bullying

    MRH has a strict policy against bullying. 

    Policy JFCF: BULLYING

    In accordance with state law, bullying is defined as intimidation, unwanted aggressive behavior, or harassment that is repetitive or is substantially likely to be repeated and causes a reasonable student to fear for his or her physical safety or property; that substantially interferes with the educational performance, opportunities or benefits of any student without exception; or that substantially disrupts the orderly operation of the school. Bullying includes, but is not limited to: physical actions, including violence, gestures, theft, or property damage; oral, written, or electronic communication, including name-calling, put-downs, extortion, or threats; or threats of reprisal or retaliation for reporting such acts.

    Cyberbullying – A form of bullying committed by transmission of a communication including, but not limited to, a message, text, sound or image by means of an electronic device including, but not limited to, a telephone, wireless telephone or other wireless communication device, computer or pager. The district has jurisdiction over cyberbullying that uses the district's technology resources or that originates on district property, at a district activity or on district transportation. Even when cyberbullying does not involve district property, activities or technology resources, the district will impose consequences and discipline for those who engage in cyberbullying if there is a sufficient nexus to the educational environment, the behavior materially and substantially disrupts the educational environment, the communication involves a Bullying and Cyberbullying (see board policy JFCF) – Intimidation, unwanted aggressive behavior, or harassment that is repetitive or is substantially likely to be repeated and causes a reasonable student to fear for their physical safety or property; that substantially interferes with the educational performance, opportunities or benefits of any student without exception; or that substantially disrupts the orderly operation of the school. Bullying includes, but is not limited to physical actions, including violence, gestures, theft or property damage; oral, written or electronic communication, including name-calling, put-downs, extortion or threats; or threats of reprisal or retaliation for reporting such acts. Cyberbullying is a form of bullying committed by transmission of a communication including, but not limited to, a message, text, sound or image by means of an electronic device including, but not limited to, a telephone, wireless telephone or other wireless communication device, computer or pager.

    Bullying has many consequences.  At MRH, there is a strict policy on how the district handles disciplining parties who engage in bullying.  Policy  JG-R1: STUDENT DISCIPLINE, last revised and reviewed 7/15/21, states the following:

    • First Offense: Detention, in-school suspension, or 1-180 days out-of-school suspension.

    • Subsequent Offense: 1-180 days out-of-school suspension or expulsion.

    October 10:

    Last week we covered defining what bullying is and, just as important, the consequences of it in the MRH School District.  Today we will discuss bullying warning signs and also share some valuable educational resources for future reference.  

    Recent statistics show that only 20% of school bullying incidents during the school year are reported according to the 2018 Indicators of School Crime and Safety report authored by the Institute of Educational Sciences: National Center for Educational Statistics. Reporting is key. It is important to have an ongoing dialogue between a student and parent or a trusted adult.  

    To recognize the warning signs of bullying, CLICK HERE to learn more.

    MRH recognizes the following websites as great resources to learn about bullying.

    Bullying - STOPBULLYING.GOV

    Cyberbullying - NetSmartz

    October 17:

    Bystanders Fact Sheet 

    https://www.stopbullying.gov/prevention/bystanders-to-bullying#:~:text=Bystanders%20are%20Essential%20to%20Bullying%20Prevention%20and%20Intervention 

    Bullying can occur during or after school hours. While most reported bullying happens in the school building, a significant percentage also happens in places like on the playground or the bus. It can also happen when traveling to or from school, in the youth’s neighborhood, or on the Internet.

    There are three types of bullying:

    Verbal bullying is saying or writing mean things. Verbal bullying includes:

    • Teasing

    • Name-calling

    • Inappropriate sexual comments

    • Taunting

    • Threatening to cause harm

    Social bullying, sometimes referred to as relational bullying, involves hurting someone’s reputation or relationships. Social bullying includes:

    • Leaving someone out on purpose

    • Telling other children not to be friends with someone

    • Spreading rumors about someone

    • Embarrassing someone in public

    Physical bullying involves hurting a person’s body or possessions. Physical bullying includes:

    • Hitting/kicking/pinching

    • Spitting

    • Tripping/pushing

    • Taking or breaking someone’s things

    • Making mean or rude hand gestures

    October 24

    How to Report Bullying at MRH?

      • App (tipline icon). Download the app by searching Maplewood Richmond Heights School District in the Google or Apple stores.

      • Website (Confidential Safety Reporting) link on Home Page under Quick Links